Did We Get Our Kids to Eat?

Emily Oster

4 min Read Emily Oster

Emily Oster

Did We Get Our Kids to Eat?

The ParentData team tests "Lunchbox: So Easy, So Delicious, So Much Fun to Eat"

Emily Oster

4 min Read

On Monday I posted an interview with Marnie Hanel about her bento lunch box book. As part of the “research” for that post, we had to try it out. I recruited a ParentData team member who has a 2-year-old and a 3-year-old. I agreed to experiment with my 7-year-old (the 11-year-old declined to participate).

The challenge was to produce five(ish) days of meals, document them in pictures, and report on the eating of the food. Let’s see how we did…

Beginning thoughts

Emily:

As I have said, I am skeptical about this whole enterprise. However: my kid often eats almost none of his lunch, so I guess it cannot get worse. He was extremely excited about the book, took it up to his room, and began marking off all the items he wanted to have. In a number of cases, what he wanted was impossible (i.e. included nuts, or ingredients I refused to get), although I will say he showed some flexibility with substitutions. We ended up with a list of five lunches.

Katie:

I want to say up front that the problem in my house is not the kids. For a 2- and a 3-year-old, they aren’t particularly picky about food (at least one of them gladly ate some chicken hearts Emily cooked!). The problem is me. I hate packing lunches — probably more than any other parenting duty I can think of.

I think there are two issues. First, performance anxiety. Because of the pandemic and the ages of my kids, very little of my parenting has been on display for anyone who doesn’t live in my home. So preschool lunches basically feel like the first homework I’m turning in to someone else to grade. (Obviously, there are no grades and this is in my head.) The second issue is a dislike of tedium, especially as it relates to cutting up strawberries.

But I was excited to give the book a try. At the very least, I thought, the meal suggestions would relieve one part of the lunch process — coming up with ideas for what to pack to begin with.

Day 1: 

Emily:

Before and after photos below. He requested sushi, which I know he doesn’t eat. However, he did eat some of it, reporting that he “didn’t like it but ate some anyway.” That felt like a bit of a win. The other win was the fruit, which actually got eaten. This will prove to be an enduring note: stuff on sticks is fun. This was an easy lunch to put together, other than having to remember to buy the sushi.

Katie:

Day 1 was a big mommy fail!

But first, the positives: I., 3, and A., 2, both loved this! Lately I. has been obsessed with “the story of how the asteroid made the dinosaurs go extinct,” so we captured that in meal form. A. is a more cuddly type who loves hearts and teddy bears and flowers, so that is what she got. Overall, this is a pretty basic lunch (carrots, cheese, ham sandwich, snack), but it still felt special.

Now the fail: I got so wrapped up in amusing myself with the styling that I forgot that the school doesn’t allow popcorn (choking hazard), so that part of their lunch was taken away. The kids ate everything else.

Bonus fail: red food coloring doesn’t make popcorn pink. It makes it look bloody.

Day 2: 

Emily:

You can see my pajama pants in this photo, and I’m realizing that these were maternity pants from Penelope’s birth. Still going strong 11 years in.

This mini pizza got eaten, but I’d judge it only a moderate success (the cookie pie was completely consumed). Making a pizza was some work (we have a great toaster oven, but still), and Finn said it was “a little wet.”

Katie:

I was feeling a bit gun-shy after the previous lunch, so we stuck to basic foods again, but with a different snack and a new theme for both lunches: Halloween. It took forever to cut the carrot slices into little jack-o’-lanterns, but I chuckled to myself the whole time I was working on it. And it was also a handy escape from dealing with the post-dinner/pre-bedtime-routine chaos hour, which my husband had to handle on his own.

The kids ate everything (and I ate the carrot cutouts), but I re-learned the lesson about food coloring being a bad idea when they both came home with green hands and faces from their “wormy” apples.

Day 3: 

Emily:

This was a sort of attempt to replicate one of the pictures in the book (although with bacon instead of eggs). We learned Finn doesn’t like chicken sausage, but the rest was good. I enjoyed attempting to stack the jam pancake sandwiches. You can see here I’ve really gotten into the idea of sticks in things.

Katie:

I tried not to resort to sandwiches and ended up with this cucumber caterpillar creature, a “worm” in quinoa dirt, and some flower apples and grapes for the “bugs” to munch. I. normally likes quinoa but did not like it after the comparison with dirt was made. Flower apples were a hit with both, and I was happy to eat the remaining apple bits.

Day 4: 

Emily:

This is probably the biggest fail. I thought he would like it (contains sausage and mozzarella! Has sticks!), but he reported he didn’t like the crackers (or apparently anything else). This came back pretty much completely uneaten, other than the mini cupcakes. No one in my house has ever turned down a mini cupcake.

Katie:

A. was home sick and I. was upset about leaving her behind. In the morning jumble, I did not get a picture of I.’s lunch, which, I can assure you, was a masterpiece.

Once A. woke up, I was inspired to try to get her to eat something by borrowing a bit of Lunchbox spirit for her breakfast.

With these pancakes, food coloring redeemed itself. But the real winner is candy eyes, which make every food more amusing. A. ate one pancake, the middle one, which was modeled after Stumpkin.

Day 5-ish: 

Emily:

I forgot to take a before picture here, but this was probably the biggest win, since it came after the challenge period. There was actually a Day 5 of the challenge, but I do not feel I can post and take credit for it because our amazing babysitter made it. That meal involved a sandwich shaped like a cake with pepper candles, chocolate-dipped pretzels, and mini cupcakes (this is all straight out of the book). Finn ate it, but, again, it feels like cheating since my only contribution was thanking our nanny profusely and hoping desperately she doesn’t leave us.

Anyway! This meal is reflective of where we have gotten to. It was some leftover chicken and pasta bake, some fruit on sticks, and a cookie. He ate way more than he used to, it was not hard to produce, and he was happy.

Katie:

A. was sick again and was only interested in eating candy eyeballs without any real food attached. I. was down for a grand finale school lunch, though, and wanted to help create it. My inner lunch artist screamed “no,” but my more mature side agreed — and we ended up with a lunch that looked exactly as I. wanted. She had fun, ate the whole thing, and I only tweaked the placement of a few things after she stopped paying attention.

Final thoughts

Emily:

First, Katie, I feel you really won this round. The pancakes are a masterpiece.

Going forward, I’m not sure how much we’ll use the specific lunches in the book — although Finn has it on his shelf, and I suspect ideas will percolate up. But we will definitely keep using the bento, and I think I got some important lessons here: Food on sticks is fun. Seeing the variety all at once and having multiple things to eat is fun. Giving Finn more input into the process may also have been helpful.

The other big change is I bought myself a bento salad box, which I highly recommend. So now I can stack all my tiny snacks together. Adorable.

Katie:

I’m reminded a bit of that scene in Julia where Julia Child, who has just extolled the virtues of cooking an elaborate meal as a route to joy and sense mastery, is confronted by a skeptical Betty Friedan. In the case of the lunch boxes, I think Julia Child was onto something — at least for me. Making meal prep a more interesting challenge helped me resent it a bit less. Sure, I probably still would have rather been doing some other project. But given that lunches have to get made, doing it this way adds fun. And the kids liked it too.

We’re going to keep using the tools to throw at least a little spice into every lunch. And I might even make myself some bloody-looking popcorn every now and again.

Update: I got a note from I.’s teacher several days after this experiment to let me know that she hadn’t eaten any of her lunch (except for her raspberries) in days. It looks like fun lunch needs to come back in force.

A picky-eater child holds up a stem of broccoli and frowns.

Jun 29 2020

9 min read

Kids, Food, and Picky Eating

Today’s post is on kids, food, and picky eating. This is largely excerpted from Cribsheet so if you like it, Read more

Emily Oster
Kids multivitamins are piled on a pink background.

Nov 15 2022

2 min read

Does My Picky Eater Need Multivitamins?

Should I give my picky eater multivitamins? —Anonymous I am a vitamin skeptic. I’ve written about it before, and it’s Read more

Emily Oster
A parent holds up a child, dressed as a superhero, as the child flies through the air.

Aug 31 2023

5 min read

One Thing to Make Parenting Easier

Kids are headed back to school next week, if they are not already there. This brings all kinds of emotions Read more

Emily Oster
A picky-eater child holds up a stem of broccoli and frowns.

Nov 07 2023

4 min read

Will My Picky Eater Become a Picky Adult?

Despite following the guidance of Solid Starts and other professionals since her birth, I have a 20-month-old who barely eats. Read more

Emily Oster

Instagram

left right
Potty training can feel like a Mount Everest-size challenge, and sadly, our evidence-based guidance is poor. So, I created a survey to collate advice and feedback on success from about 6,000 participants.

How long does potty training take? We found that there is a strong basic pattern here: the later you wait to start, the shorter time it takes to potty train. On average, people who start at under 18 months report it takes them about 12 weeks for their child to be fully trained (using the toilet consistently for both peeing and pooping). For those who start between 3 and 3.5, it’s more like nine days. Keep in mind that for all of these age groups, there is a range of length of time from a few days to over a year. Sometimes parents are told that if you do it right, it only takes a few days. While that is true for some people, it is definitely not the norm.

If you’re in the throes of potty training, hang in there! 

#emilyoster #parentdata #pottytraining #pottytrainingtips #toddlerlife

Potty training can feel like a Mount Everest-size challenge, and sadly, our evidence-based guidance is poor. So, I created a survey to collate advice and feedback on success from about 6,000 participants.

How long does potty training take? We found that there is a strong basic pattern here: the later you wait to start, the shorter time it takes to potty train. On average, people who start at under 18 months report it takes them about 12 weeks for their child to be fully trained (using the toilet consistently for both peeing and pooping). For those who start between 3 and 3.5, it’s more like nine days. Keep in mind that for all of these age groups, there is a range of length of time from a few days to over a year. Sometimes parents are told that if you do it right, it only takes a few days. While that is true for some people, it is definitely not the norm.

If you’re in the throes of potty training, hang in there!

#emilyoster #parentdata #pottytraining #pottytrainingtips #toddlerlife
...

For children or adults with severe food allergies, they can be incredibly scary and restrictive. We may imagine that it’s easy to deal with a peanut allergy by, say, not eating peanut butter sandwiches. But for someone with a severe version of this allergy, they may never be able to go to a restaurant, for fear of a severe reaction to something in the air. Right now, there’s only one approved treatment for severe allergies like this and it’s limited to peanuts.

This is why the new medication Xolair is very exciting. It promises a second possible treatment avenue and one that works for other allergens. A new trail analyzed data from 177 children with severe food allergies. Two-thirds of the treatment group were able to tolerate the specified endpoint, versus just 7% of the placebo group. This is a very large treatment effect, and the authors found similarly large impacts on other allergens. 

There are some caveats: This treatment won’t work for everyone. (One-third of participants did not respond to it.) Additionally, this treatment is an injection given every two to four weeks, indefinitely. This may make it less palatable to children. 

Overall, even with caveats, this is life-changing news for many families!

#xolair #foodallergies #allergies #peanutallergy #emilyoster #parentdata

For children or adults with severe food allergies, they can be incredibly scary and restrictive. We may imagine that it’s easy to deal with a peanut allergy by, say, not eating peanut butter sandwiches. But for someone with a severe version of this allergy, they may never be able to go to a restaurant, for fear of a severe reaction to something in the air. Right now, there’s only one approved treatment for severe allergies like this and it’s limited to peanuts.

This is why the new medication Xolair is very exciting. It promises a second possible treatment avenue and one that works for other allergens. A new trail analyzed data from 177 children with severe food allergies. Two-thirds of the treatment group were able to tolerate the specified endpoint, versus just 7% of the placebo group. This is a very large treatment effect, and the authors found similarly large impacts on other allergens.

There are some caveats: This treatment won’t work for everyone. (One-third of participants did not respond to it.) Additionally, this treatment is an injection given every two to four weeks, indefinitely. This may make it less palatable to children.

Overall, even with caveats, this is life-changing news for many families!

#xolair #foodallergies #allergies #peanutallergy #emilyoster #parentdata
...

If you have a fever during pregnancy, you should take Tylenol, both because it will make you feel better and because of concerns about fever in pregnancy (although these are also overstated).

The evidence that suggests risks to Tylenol focuses largely on more extensive exposure — say, taking it for more than 28 days during pregnancy. There is no credible evidence, even correlational, to suggest that taking it occasionally for a fever or headache would be an issue.

People take Tylenol for a reason. For many people, the choice may be between debilitating weekly migraines and regular Tylenol usage. The impacts studies suggest are very small. In making this decision, we should weigh the real, known benefit against the suggestion of this possible risk. Perhaps not everyone will come out at the same place on this, but it is crucial we give people the tools to make the choice for themselves.

#emilyoster #parentdata #tylenol #pregnancy #pregnancytips

If you have a fever during pregnancy, you should take Tylenol, both because it will make you feel better and because of concerns about fever in pregnancy (although these are also overstated).

The evidence that suggests risks to Tylenol focuses largely on more extensive exposure — say, taking it for more than 28 days during pregnancy. There is no credible evidence, even correlational, to suggest that taking it occasionally for a fever or headache would be an issue.

People take Tylenol for a reason. For many people, the choice may be between debilitating weekly migraines and regular Tylenol usage. The impacts studies suggest are very small. In making this decision, we should weigh the real, known benefit against the suggestion of this possible risk. Perhaps not everyone will come out at the same place on this, but it is crucial we give people the tools to make the choice for themselves.

#emilyoster #parentdata #tylenol #pregnancy #pregnancytips
...

Parenting trends are like Cabbage Patch Kids: they’re usually only popular because a bunch of people are using them! Most of the time, these trends are not based on new scientific research, and even if they are, that new research doesn’t reflect all of what we’ve studied before.

In the future, before hopping onto the latest trend, check the data first. Unlike Cabbage Patch Kids, parenting trends can add a lot of unnecessary stress and challenges to your plate. What’s a recent trend that you’ve been wondering about?

#parentdata #emilyoster #parentingtips #parentingadvice #parentinghacks

Parenting trends are like Cabbage Patch Kids: they’re usually only popular because a bunch of people are using them! Most of the time, these trends are not based on new scientific research, and even if they are, that new research doesn’t reflect all of what we’ve studied before.

In the future, before hopping onto the latest trend, check the data first. Unlike Cabbage Patch Kids, parenting trends can add a lot of unnecessary stress and challenges to your plate. What’s a recent trend that you’ve been wondering about?

#parentdata #emilyoster #parentingtips #parentingadvice #parentinghacks
...

As of this week, 1 million copies of my books have been sold. This feels humbling and, frankly, unbelievable. I’m so thankful to those of you who’ve read and passed along your recommendations of the books.

When I wrote Expecting Better, I had no plan for all of this — I wrote that book because I felt compelled to write it, because it was the book I wanted to read. As I’ve come out with more books, and now ParentData, I am closer to seeing what I hope we can all create. That is: a world where everyone has access to reliable data, based on causal evidence, to make informed, confident decisions that work for their families.

I’m so grateful you’re all here as a part of this, and I want to thank you! If you’ve been waiting for the right moment to sign up for full access to ParentData, this is it. ⭐️ Comment “Link” for a DM with a discount code for 20% off of a new monthly or annual subscription to ParentData! 

Thank you again for being the best community of readers and internet-friends on the planet. I am so lucky to have you all here.

#parentdata #emilyoster #expectingbetter #cribsheet #familyfirm #parentingcommunity

As of this week, 1 million copies of my books have been sold. This feels humbling and, frankly, unbelievable. I’m so thankful to those of you who’ve read and passed along your recommendations of the books.

When I wrote Expecting Better, I had no plan for all of this — I wrote that book because I felt compelled to write it, because it was the book I wanted to read. As I’ve come out with more books, and now ParentData, I am closer to seeing what I hope we can all create. That is: a world where everyone has access to reliable data, based on causal evidence, to make informed, confident decisions that work for their families.

I’m so grateful you’re all here as a part of this, and I want to thank you! If you’ve been waiting for the right moment to sign up for full access to ParentData, this is it. ⭐️ Comment “Link” for a DM with a discount code for 20% off of a new monthly or annual subscription to ParentData!

Thank you again for being the best community of readers and internet-friends on the planet. I am so lucky to have you all here.

#parentdata #emilyoster #expectingbetter #cribsheet #familyfirm #parentingcommunity
...

Just eat your Cheerios and move on.

Just eat your Cheerios and move on. ...

The AAP’s guidelines recommend sleeping in the same room as your baby “ideally for the first six months.” However, the risk of SIDS is dramatically lower after four months, and the evidence in favor of the protective effect of room sharing is quite weak (both overall and even more so after four months). There is also growing evidence that infants who sleep in their own room by four months sleep better at four months, better at nine months, and even better at 30 months.

With this in mind, it’s worth asking why this recommendation continues at all — or at least why the AAP doesn’t push it back to four months. They say decreased arousals from sleep are linked to SIDS, which could mean that babies sleeping in their own room is risky. But this link is extremely indirect, and they do not show direct evidence to support it.

According to the data we have, parents should sleep in the same room as a baby for as long as it works for them! Sharing a room with a child may have negative impacts on both child and adult sleep. We should give families more help in navigating these trade-offs and making the decisions that work best for them.

#emilyoster #parentdata #roomsharing #sids #parentingguide

The AAP’s guidelines recommend sleeping in the same room as your baby “ideally for the first six months.” However, the risk of SIDS is dramatically lower after four months, and the evidence in favor of the protective effect of room sharing is quite weak (both overall and even more so after four months). There is also growing evidence that infants who sleep in their own room by four months sleep better at four months, better at nine months, and even better at 30 months.

With this in mind, it’s worth asking why this recommendation continues at all — or at least why the AAP doesn’t push it back to four months. They say decreased arousals from sleep are linked to SIDS, which could mean that babies sleeping in their own room is risky. But this link is extremely indirect, and they do not show direct evidence to support it.

According to the data we have, parents should sleep in the same room as a baby for as long as it works for them! Sharing a room with a child may have negative impacts on both child and adult sleep. We should give families more help in navigating these trade-offs and making the decisions that work best for them.

#emilyoster #parentdata #roomsharing #sids #parentingguide
...

It was an absolute pleasure to be featured on the @tamronhallshow! We talked about all things data-driven parenting and, in this clip, what I call the plague of secret parenting. To balance having a career and having a family, we can’t hide the fact that we’re parents. If mothers and fathers at the top can speak more openly about child-care obligations, it will help us all set a new precedent.

Watch the full segment at the link in my bio 🔗

#tamronhall #tamronhallshow #emilyoster #parentingsupport #workingparents

It was an absolute pleasure to be featured on the @tamronhallshow! We talked about all things data-driven parenting and, in this clip, what I call the plague of secret parenting. To balance having a career and having a family, we can’t hide the fact that we’re parents. If mothers and fathers at the top can speak more openly about child-care obligations, it will help us all set a new precedent.

Watch the full segment at the link in my bio 🔗

#tamronhall #tamronhallshow #emilyoster #parentingsupport #workingparents
...

Invisible labor. It’s the work — in our households especially — that has to happen but that no one sees. It’s making the doctor’s appointment, ensuring birthday cards are purchased, remembering the milk.

My guest on this episode, @everodsky, has come up with a solution here, or at least a way for us to recognize the problem and make our own solutions. I’ve wanted to speak with Eve for ages, since I read her book Fair Play. We had a great conversation about the division of household labor, one I think you’ll get a lot out of!

Listen and subscribe to ParentData with Emily Oster in your favorite podcast app 🎧

#emilyoster #parentdata #parentdatapodcast #parentingpodcast #householdtips #fairplay #invisiblelabor

Invisible labor. It’s the work — in our households especially — that has to happen but that no one sees. It’s making the doctor’s appointment, ensuring birthday cards are purchased, remembering the milk.

My guest on this episode, @everodsky, has come up with a solution here, or at least a way for us to recognize the problem and make our own solutions. I’ve wanted to speak with Eve for ages, since I read her book Fair Play. We had a great conversation about the division of household labor, one I think you’ll get a lot out of!

Listen and subscribe to ParentData with Emily Oster in your favorite podcast app 🎧

#emilyoster #parentdata #parentdatapodcast #parentingpodcast #householdtips #fairplay #invisiblelabor
...

Prenatal vitamins 💊 If there is any product that seems designed to prey on our fears, it’s this one. You’re newly pregnant and you want to do it right. Everyone agrees you need prenatal vitamins, so you get them. But do you want to be that person who just… buys the generic prenatal vitamins?

Good news: fancier vitamins are not better.  Folic acid is the most important prenatal ingredient. Iron (with vitamin C) and DHA are also nice to have. Other included ingredients have only weak or no evidence to support their use. (If you do not consume animal products, add B12, plus a few others depending on your diet.)

Vitamins are just vitamins. Any prenatal vitamin that contains these is enough. 

Comment “Link” for a DM to an article with everything you need to know about prenatal vitamins.

#emilyoster #parentdata #prenatalvitamins #pregnancydiet #pregnancytips

Prenatal vitamins 💊 If there is any product that seems designed to prey on our fears, it’s this one. You’re newly pregnant and you want to do it right. Everyone agrees you need prenatal vitamins, so you get them. But do you want to be that person who just… buys the generic prenatal vitamins?

Good news: fancier vitamins are not better. Folic acid is the most important prenatal ingredient. Iron (with vitamin C) and DHA are also nice to have. Other included ingredients have only weak or no evidence to support their use. (If you do not consume animal products, add B12, plus a few others depending on your diet.)

Vitamins are just vitamins. Any prenatal vitamin that contains these is enough.

Comment “Link” for a DM to an article with everything you need to know about prenatal vitamins.

#emilyoster #parentdata #prenatalvitamins #pregnancydiet #pregnancytips
...

When it comes to introducing your newborn to the world, timing matters. It’s a good idea to minimize germ exposure in the first 6-8 weeks; after that, it’s inevitable and, very likely, a good idea! This doesn’t mean you need to be trapped inside. The most significant exposure risks are from seeing other people at home — family, etc. These interactions are not infinitely risky, but they do pose more risk than a walk or a trip to the grocery store, since they involve closer interaction. Think simple and make sure everyone is washing their hands before holding the baby. 💛

#parentdata #emilyoster #newborncare #parentingadvice #parentingtips

When it comes to introducing your newborn to the world, timing matters. It’s a good idea to minimize germ exposure in the first 6-8 weeks; after that, it’s inevitable and, very likely, a good idea! This doesn’t mean you need to be trapped inside. The most significant exposure risks are from seeing other people at home — family, etc. These interactions are not infinitely risky, but they do pose more risk than a walk or a trip to the grocery store, since they involve closer interaction. Think simple and make sure everyone is washing their hands before holding the baby. 💛

#parentdata #emilyoster #newborncare #parentingadvice #parentingtips
...

The first edition of Hot Flash is out now! Comment “Link” for a DM to learn more about the late-reproductive stage.

There are times when we expect hormonal shifts. Our reproductive lives are bookended by puberty and menopause. We discuss those changes often because they are definitive and dramatic — a first period is something many of us remember clearly. But between ages 13 and 53, our hormones are changing in more subtle ways. During the late-reproductive stage (in your 40s), you can expect a lot of changes in your menstrual cycle, including the length and symptoms you experience throughout. It’s an important time in our lives that is often overlooked!

🔥 Hot Flash from ParentData is a weekly newsletter on navigating your health and hormones in the post-reproductive years. Written by Dr. Gillian Goddard, Hot Flash provides all of the information you need to have a productive, evidence-based conversation about hormonal health with your doctor.

#emilyoster #parentdata #hotflash #perimenopause #womenshealth

The first edition of Hot Flash is out now! Comment “Link” for a DM to learn more about the late-reproductive stage.

There are times when we expect hormonal shifts. Our reproductive lives are bookended by puberty and menopause. We discuss those changes often because they are definitive and dramatic — a first period is something many of us remember clearly. But between ages 13 and 53, our hormones are changing in more subtle ways. During the late-reproductive stage (in your 40s), you can expect a lot of changes in your menstrual cycle, including the length and symptoms you experience throughout. It’s an important time in our lives that is often overlooked!

🔥 Hot Flash from ParentData is a weekly newsletter on navigating your health and hormones in the post-reproductive years. Written by Dr. Gillian Goddard, Hot Flash provides all of the information you need to have a productive, evidence-based conversation about hormonal health with your doctor.

#emilyoster #parentdata #hotflash #perimenopause #womenshealth
...

There are plenty of reels telling you how to parent. Plenty of panic headlines saying that “studies show” what’s best for your kid. Even good data, from a trusted source, can send us into a spiral of comparison. But I want you to remember that no one knows your kid better than you. It’s important to absorb the research, but only you will know the approach that works best for you and your child. 💙

Now tell me in the comments: what’s a parenting move you’ve made recently that feels right to you?

#parentingcommunity #parentingsupport #parentingquotes #emilyoster #parentdata

There are plenty of reels telling you how to parent. Plenty of panic headlines saying that “studies show” what’s best for your kid. Even good data, from a trusted source, can send us into a spiral of comparison. But I want you to remember that no one knows your kid better than you. It’s important to absorb the research, but only you will know the approach that works best for you and your child. 💙

Now tell me in the comments: what’s a parenting move you’ve made recently that feels right to you?

#parentingcommunity #parentingsupport #parentingquotes #emilyoster #parentdata
...

Let’s talk about sex (after) baby! Today on the podcast, I was lucky enough to speak with @enagoski about her new book on sexual connection in long-term relationships. Especially after having kids, this is something many people struggle with. Emily tells us to stop worrying about what’s “normal” and focus on pleasure in its many forms.

Listen and subscribe to ParentData with Emily Oster in your favorite podcast app 🎧

#parentdata #parentdatapodcast #emilyoster #emilynagoski #comeasyouare #cometogether #longtermrelationship #intimacy #relationships

Let’s talk about sex (after) baby! Today on the podcast, I was lucky enough to speak with @enagoski about her new book on sexual connection in long-term relationships. Especially after having kids, this is something many people struggle with. Emily tells us to stop worrying about what’s “normal” and focus on pleasure in its many forms.

Listen and subscribe to ParentData with Emily Oster in your favorite podcast app 🎧

#parentdata #parentdatapodcast #emilyoster #emilynagoski #comeasyouare #cometogether #longtermrelationship #intimacy #relationships
...

Ever wondered if you can safely use leftover baby formula? 🍼 The CDC says to throw out unused formula immediately because of the risk of bacterial growth. However, research suggests that bacterial concentrations do not appreciably increase after 3, 12, or even 24 hours at refrigerator temperatures. Good news! This means there’s not a strong data-based reason to throw out formula right away if you store it in the fridge.

Comment “Link” for a DM to an article on another common formula question: should you throw away old formula powder?

#emilyoster #parentdata #babyformula #babyfeeding #parentingstruggles

Ever wondered if you can safely use leftover baby formula? 🍼 The CDC says to throw out unused formula immediately because of the risk of bacterial growth. However, research suggests that bacterial concentrations do not appreciably increase after 3, 12, or even 24 hours at refrigerator temperatures. Good news! This means there’s not a strong data-based reason to throw out formula right away if you store it in the fridge.

Comment “Link” for a DM to an article on another common formula question: should you throw away old formula powder?

#emilyoster #parentdata #babyformula #babyfeeding #parentingstruggles
...

What’s the most important piece of advice for new parents? Here’s one answer, but I want to hear from you! Share your suggestions in the comments ⬇️

#emilyoster #parentdata #parentingtips #parentingadvice #newparents #parentingcommunity

What’s the most important piece of advice for new parents? Here’s one answer, but I want to hear from you! Share your suggestions in the comments ⬇️

#emilyoster #parentdata #parentingtips #parentingadvice #newparents #parentingcommunity
...

What's in the bag of a Vagina Economist? 👀 Someone please tell me this looks familiar to you.

What`s in the bag of a Vagina Economist? 👀 Someone please tell me this looks familiar to you. ...