Emily Oster

11 min Read Emily Oster

Emily Oster

Kids’ Vaccine Safety, by the Numbers

Emily Oster

11 min Read
When COVID vaccines for 5- to 11-year-olds were first approved, it was clear to me that there were three groups of parents. Group 1: people who would kick down the door to be first in line for vaccination. Group 3: people who are not going to vaccinate their children unless it becomes required. And then there is Group 2, somewhere in the middle. Parents who aren’t necessarily opposed to vaccinating in this age group but who wanted to wait, to see the first round of vaccines, to make sure the relatively small initial trials hadn’t missed rare adverse events.

For this “waiting” group, I would suspect the decision about vaccination is starting to feel more urgent. Omicron is more contagious, even if not more serious, and vaccination provides protection for children against COVID infection. This protection means they are less likely to spread the virus to vulnerable relatives. Also, we’re starting to see more restrictions pop up in some states — kids may be restricted from recreation or school as a result of not being vaccinated. All the reasons to vaccinate your kids before (which I talked about here) are now more true.

The good news, then, is that we are now in a much better position to start talking about large-scale safety results. The American Academy of Pediatrics reports that approximately 5 million children ages 5 to 11 have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. A subset of these children have had two doses. These sample sizes are getting large enough that even very rare events should start to show up. If there is a complication that arises 1 in a million times, we’d already expect to see at least five of them. And that’s a really, really rare complication.

Public-health officials have emphasized that we aren’t seeing concerning reports of side effects in kids. Which is a great message (and I think a correct one), but as usual it lacks detail. For at least some worried parents, they want to see the actual data behind this statement. What I want to do today, then, is dig into the data that is coming in through the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, or VAERS, about the COVID-19 vaccine in kids.

What is the VAERS? 

Before getting started, let’s review what the VAERS is. It is a CDC reporting system for adverse events associated with vaccinations. The CDC collates reports from individuals (including medical providers, but also patients and caregivers) about incidents possibly linked to vaccines. The agency does this for all vaccines, not just COVID, and you can access the data publicly here.

The VAERS is a valuable data set, since it gives a window into possible issues with vaccines, and it harnesses the power of distributed information to get that information quickly. However, it is often difficult to draw strong causal conclusions from what we observe in the VAERS.

To understand why, consider the following: Imagine that people believed that cutting an infant’s fingernails led to possible illness, and thus there was an adverse-event reporting system for fingernail cutting.

In all likelihood, this system would get all kinds of reports. There would be parents saying that the day after they cut their infant’s fingernails, the baby came down with a terrible fever. Others would say they had a very liquid-looking poop. You’d get reports of children who didn’t sleep well for days after the fingernail cutting, and others about babies crying uncontrollably for hours.

These would all be true things that happened. But they would not be causally linked to the fingernail cutting! Babies have weird poops and they cry a lot. In order to figure out whether there was any real link, you’d need to know the general base rate of these events — how likely people are to report them when there was no fingernail cutting. But that isn’t something we have a reporting system for. There is no website where you can report every time your kid has an unusual poop.

You’d have to try to piece together whether these adverse events really seem more common among babies whose nails are cut than those whose aren’t. This is especially hard for things that happen all the time, like “baby cried.”

In your fingernail-reporting system, you probably would also learn something. You’d get many reports of finger injury — cuts in need of Band-Aids. This is not something that happens all the time, and there is an obvious mechanism for the connection with nail cutting. So you would probably conclude that fingernail cutting is linked to accidental finger cutting, which is true.

This example extends to vaccines. If you tell people to report anything unusual that happens after a vaccine, they will share a lot of incidents. The challenge — which I will try to meet below — is to figure out what to make of them. To try to pull out the signal from the noise.

With that background, let’s dive into the data.

Overview of data

To do this analysis, I downloaded all the VAERS data for 2021. The first file has a full list of incident reports, including the text in the report (there’s a free-entry field), information on hospitalization, and characteristics of the individual like their age and sex. The second file lets you link in vaccine type, and the third has extracted some information on the main concerns so you do not have to parse the text yourself.

I merged these together and limited them to ages 5 to 11 and the COVID-19 vaccine.

When I did this, I found a total sample of 3,198 adverse events. As noted above, about 5 million children have received a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. If (say) a third of these children have also received a second shot, that is 6.65 million doses. This adverse-event rate would be, then, about 1 in 2,100.

But what are these events? We can see details!

Parents lying

Of the 3,198 adverse events, 915 are kids (nearly all of them age 11) getting the COVID-19 vaccine before they were eligible. The reason for this is that their parents lied about their age. To give you a flavor, here are a couple of examples in the text…

Patient was booked by his family in system as his 13 year old sister. Information was changed at vaccine site to this patient who was only 11 years 5 months old. This was not caught until after the patient received his shot. We are not aware of any untoward effects. Patient’s mother was informed this would be reported to the DPH and CDC. Patient’s mother indicated she was aware he was not eligible at this time. This was her second attempt to get him vaccinated as he was turned away at a previous clinic.

Father took her to a pharmacy and lied to the pharmacist about her birthday so she could get a COVID vaccine so he could go on vacation. Parents are divorced and mom has sole custody and father is not allowed to make medical decisions without her consent. He also lied to the pharmacist again when they were confirming the birthday and falsified medical documents to make it appear that the patient was eligible for the Pfizer covid vaccine.

These incidents do not have negative vaccine impacts associated with them. The adverse event is the incorrect vaccine.

Removing these, we are down to 2,283 adverse events.

Dosing issues, etc.

Of these remaining 2,283 reports, 295 of the records specifically indicate that there was no adverse event; these are generally issues with incorrect entry of the vaccine record, or some issue with preparation. Another 539 of them are cases of incorrect dosing (child given adult dose; child moves arm so full dose not delivered) or an issue with vaccine preparation. In these 539 cases, there were no additional side effects reported. The event, again, is the dosing.

Removing these, we are down to 1,469 adverse events, or an adverse event rate of about 1 in 4,500.

Most common side effects

Digging into these 1,469 cases, we can start to isolate the most common complaints. The three most common categories are nausea and vomiting (present in 18% of cases), fainting or dizziness (25% of cases; mostly dizziness), and pain (present in 12% of cases, typically at the injection site). These are minor and self-limiting side effects in nearly all cases.

This side-effect profile is consistent with what we see, for example, with the flu vaccine. During the 2019 flu season, looking at adverse-event reports for kids getting the flu vaccine, we see pain (17%), fainting and dizziness (16%), and nausea (7%) among the leading issues. For the flu vaccine, we also commonly see rash and swelling, which doesn’t show up as prominently in the COVID vaccine.

Put simply: Of the 5 million kids who were vaccinated for COVID, there are 1,469 case reports, of which 25% include a symptom of nausea or dizziness. This is a very, very small share of the overall 5 million.

There are other isolated symptoms listed in these reports. Anxiety. Neck pain. Mouth swelling. Malaise. Eye pain. Lip blister. Some of these could be vaccine-related; others are unlikely to be. This is also true if you look at symptom lists after the flu vaccine.

Putting this together, it seems that the overall profile of most of the commonly cited side effects is similar for the COVID vaccine and the flu vaccine, which is a natural comparison.

Serious events

Nearly all of the adverse events reported after the COVID vaccine are mild and self-limiting. This is great. However: it is worth looking at whether there are any serious events.

There are 42 cases in which an adverse event is associated with a hospitalization. In a number of cases, the hospitalization does not seem to be a result of the vaccine. There are five cases of appendicitis. There are four cases of hospitalization with COVID-19 infection. There is one psychiatric hospitalization for depressive thoughts.

In other cases, it’s harder to tell. And if you read about those, they can seem really scary. This is a feature of these reports that is also true for the flu and other vaccines. Sometimes kids get sick and it’s scary. But in many cases, it seems to be clearly unrelated to the vaccine. There isn’t anything in these 42 or so cases that would suggest any particular vaccine-related concerns. It is likely that all of these, or nearly all, are incidental. Remember: this is on a base of perhaps 5 million children, 6.5 million vaccines. It’s really, really small.

Myocarditis

What about myocarditis, the heart inflammation that has been cited as a side effect of the COVID-19 vaccine in male teenagers and young adults? The VAERS system does show a substantial number of reports of myocarditis in this older age group. It’s part of how we know there are risks there, and it’s a good illustration of the value of such data.

For the younger age group, we do not see anything like this. In the hospitalizations, there are two cases in which myocarditis was suspected, both in 10-year-old boys, both recovered.

Again, this is in the context of millions and millions of shots. Even if both of these were confirmed myocarditis cases, we’d be looking at a risk of perhaps 1 in 1.5 million for boys. There are many activities you do each day that carry more than a 1-in-1.5-million risk of a daylong hospitalization.

Bottom line

These safety data are extremely reassuring. If you’re waiting to see good evidence on the real-world safety of these vaccines, this is it.

I know some parents worry about the long term. The fact is, there isn’t any data that will tell you about vaccine side effects in 10 years. Having said that, there is absolutely no reason to think such side effects would crop up. In vaccines, side effects tend to be fast. You could make a similar case that we do not know about the potential long-term side effects of COVID itself.

Kids remain at low risk of serious illness from COVID. The benefits of vaccination are lower case rates, less risk of spread, and, at least in some locations, more freedom from restrictions. These are real benefits, and these data now show they can be achieved safely.

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Milestones. We celebrate them in pregnancy, in parenting, and they’re a fun thing to celebrate at work too. Just a couple years ago I couldn’t have foreseen what this community would grow into. Today, there are over 400,000 of you here—asking questions, making others feel seen wherever they may be in their journey, and sharing information that supports data > panic. 

It has been a busy summer for the team at ParentData. I’d love to take a moment here to celebrate the 400k milestone. As I’ve said before, it’s more important than ever to put good data in the hands of parents. 

Share this post with a friend who could use a little more data, and a little less parenting overwhelm. 

📷 Me and my oldest, collaborating on “Expecting Better”

Milestones. We celebrate them in pregnancy, in parenting, and they’re a fun thing to celebrate at work too. Just a couple years ago I couldn’t have foreseen what this community would grow into. Today, there are over 400,000 of you here—asking questions, making others feel seen wherever they may be in their journey, and sharing information that supports data > panic.

It has been a busy summer for the team at ParentData. I’d love to take a moment here to celebrate the 400k milestone. As I’ve said before, it’s more important than ever to put good data in the hands of parents.

Share this post with a friend who could use a little more data, and a little less parenting overwhelm.

📷 Me and my oldest, collaborating on “Expecting Better”
...

I spend a lot of time talking people down after they read the latest panic headline. In most cases, these articles create an unnecessary amount of stress around pregnancy and parenting. This is my pro tip for understanding whether the risk presented is something you should really be worrying about.

Comment “link” for an article with other tools to help you navigate risk and uncertainty.

#emilyoster #parentdata #riskmanagement #parentstruggles #parentingstruggles

I spend a lot of time talking people down after they read the latest panic headline. In most cases, these articles create an unnecessary amount of stress around pregnancy and parenting. This is my pro tip for understanding whether the risk presented is something you should really be worrying about.

Comment “link” for an article with other tools to help you navigate risk and uncertainty.

#emilyoster #parentdata #riskmanagement #parentstruggles #parentingstruggles
...

Here’s why I think you don’t have to throw away your baby bottles.

Here’s why I think you don’t have to throw away your baby bottles. ...

Drop your toddlers favorite thing right now in the comments—then grab some popcorn.

Original thread source: Reddit @croc_docs

Drop your toddlers favorite thing right now in the comments—then grab some popcorn.

Original thread source: Reddit @croc_docs
...

Just keep wiping.

Just keep wiping. ...

Dr. Gillian Goddard sums up what she learned from the Hot Flash  S e x  Survey! Here are some key data takeaways:

🌶️ Among respondents, the most common s e x u a l frequency was 1 to 2 times per month, followed closely by 1 to 2 times per week
🌶️ 37% have found their sweet spot and are happy with the frequency of s e x they are having
🌶️ About 64% of respondents were very or somewhat satisfied with the quality of the s e x they are having

Do any of these findings surprise you? Let us know in the comments!

#hotflash #intimacy #midlifepleasure #parentdata #relationships

Dr. Gillian Goddard sums up what she learned from the Hot Flash S e x Survey! Here are some key data takeaways:

🌶️ Among respondents, the most common s e x u a l frequency was 1 to 2 times per month, followed closely by 1 to 2 times per week
🌶️ 37% have found their sweet spot and are happy with the frequency of s e x they are having
🌶️ About 64% of respondents were very or somewhat satisfied with the quality of the s e x they are having

Do any of these findings surprise you? Let us know in the comments!

#hotflash #intimacy #midlifepleasure #parentdata #relationships
...

Should your kid be in a car seat on the plane? The AAP recommends that you put kids under 40 pounds into a car seat on airplanes. However, airlines don’t require car seats.

Here’s what we know from a data standpoint:
✈️ The risk of injury to a child on a plane without a carseat is very small (about 1 in 250,000)
✈️ A JAMA Pediatrics paper estimates about 0.4 child air crash deaths per year might be prevented in the U.S. with car seats 
✈️ Cars are far more dangerous than airplanes! The same JAMA paper suggests that if 5% to 10% of families switched to driving, then we would expect more total deaths as a result of this policy. 

If you want to buy a seat for your lap infant, or bring a car seat for an older child, by all means do so! But the additional protection based on the numbers is extremely small.

#parentdata #emilyoster #flyingwithkids #flyingwithbaby #carseats #carseatsafety

Should your kid be in a car seat on the plane? The AAP recommends that you put kids under 40 pounds into a car seat on airplanes. However, airlines don’t require car seats.

Here’s what we know from a data standpoint:
✈️ The risk of injury to a child on a plane without a carseat is very small (about 1 in 250,000)
✈️ A JAMA Pediatrics paper estimates about 0.4 child air crash deaths per year might be prevented in the U.S. with car seats
✈️ Cars are far more dangerous than airplanes! The same JAMA paper suggests that if 5% to 10% of families switched to driving, then we would expect more total deaths as a result of this policy.

If you want to buy a seat for your lap infant, or bring a car seat for an older child, by all means do so! But the additional protection based on the numbers is extremely small.

#parentdata #emilyoster #flyingwithkids #flyingwithbaby #carseats #carseatsafety
...

SLEEP DATA 💤 PART 2: Let’s talk about naps. Comment “Link” for an article on what we learned about daytime sleep!

The first three months of life are a chaotic combination of irregular napping, many naps, and a few brave or lucky souls who appear to have already arrived at a two-to-three nap schedule. Over the next few months, the naps consolidate to three and then to two. By the 10-to-12-month period, a very large share of kids are napping a consistent two naps per day. Over the period between 12 and 18 months, this shifts toward one nap. And then sometime in the range of 3 to 5 years, naps are dropped. What I think is perhaps most useful about this graph is it gives a lot of color to the average napping ages that we often hear. 

Note: Survey data came from the ParentData audience and users of the Nanit sleep monitor system. Both audiences skew higher-education and higher-income than the average, and mostly have younger children. The final sample is 14,919 children. For more insights on our respondents, read the full article.

SLEEP DATA 💤 PART 2: Let’s talk about naps. Comment “Link” for an article on what we learned about daytime sleep!

The first three months of life are a chaotic combination of irregular napping, many naps, and a few brave or lucky souls who appear to have already arrived at a two-to-three nap schedule. Over the next few months, the naps consolidate to three and then to two. By the 10-to-12-month period, a very large share of kids are napping a consistent two naps per day. Over the period between 12 and 18 months, this shifts toward one nap. And then sometime in the range of 3 to 5 years, naps are dropped. What I think is perhaps most useful about this graph is it gives a lot of color to the average napping ages that we often hear.

Note: Survey data came from the ParentData audience and users of the Nanit sleep monitor system. Both audiences skew higher-education and higher-income than the average, and mostly have younger children. The final sample is 14,919 children. For more insights on our respondents, read the full article.
...

Happy Father’s Day to the Fathers and Father figures in our ParentData community! 

Tag a Dad who this holiday may be tricky for. We’re sending you love. 💛

Happy Father’s Day to the Fathers and Father figures in our ParentData community!

Tag a Dad who this holiday may be tricky for. We’re sending you love. 💛
...

“Whilst googling things like ‘new dad sad’ and ‘why am I crying new dad,’ I came across an article written by a doctor who had trouble connecting with his second child. I read the symptoms and felt an odd sense of relief.” Today we’re bringing back an essay by Kevin Maguire of @newfatherhood about his experience with paternal postpartum depression. We need to demystify these issues in order to change things for the better. Comment “Link” for a DM to read his full essay.

#parentdata #postpartum #postpartumdepression #paternalmentalhealth #newparents #emilyoster

“Whilst googling things like ‘new dad sad’ and ‘why am I crying new dad,’ I came across an article written by a doctor who had trouble connecting with his second child. I read the symptoms and felt an odd sense of relief.” Today we’re bringing back an essay by Kevin Maguire of @newfatherhood about his experience with paternal postpartum depression. We need to demystify these issues in order to change things for the better. Comment “Link” for a DM to read his full essay.

#parentdata #postpartum #postpartumdepression #paternalmentalhealth #newparents #emilyoster
...

What does the data say about children who look more like one parent? Do they also inherit more character traits and mannerisms from that parent? Let’s talk about it 🔎

#emilyoster #parentdata #parentingcommunity #lookslikedaddy #lookslikemommy

What does the data say about children who look more like one parent? Do they also inherit more character traits and mannerisms from that parent? Let’s talk about it 🔎

#emilyoster #parentdata #parentingcommunity #lookslikedaddy #lookslikemommy
...

SLEEP DATA 💤 We asked you all about your kids’ sleep—and got nearly 15,000 survey responses to better understand kids’ sleep patterns. Comment “Link” for an article that breaks down our findings!

This graph shows sleeping location by age. You’ll notice that for the first three months, most kids are in their own sleeping location in a parent’s room. Then, over the first year, this switches toward their own room. As kids age, sharing a room with a sibling becomes more common. 

Head to the newsletter for more and stay tuned for part two next week on naps! 🌙

#parentdata #emilyoster #childsleep #babysleep #parentingcommunity

SLEEP DATA 💤 We asked you all about your kids’ sleep—and got nearly 15,000 survey responses to better understand kids’ sleep patterns. Comment “Link” for an article that breaks down our findings!

This graph shows sleeping location by age. You’ll notice that for the first three months, most kids are in their own sleeping location in a parent’s room. Then, over the first year, this switches toward their own room. As kids age, sharing a room with a sibling becomes more common.

Head to the newsletter for more and stay tuned for part two next week on naps! 🌙

#parentdata #emilyoster #childsleep #babysleep #parentingcommunity
...

Weekends are good for extra cups of ☕️ and listening to podcasts. I asked our team how they pod—most people said on walks or during chores. What about you?

Comment “Link” to subscribe to ParentData with Emily Oster, joined by some excellent guests.

#parentdata #parentdatapodcast #parentingpodcast #parentingtips #emilyoster

Weekends are good for extra cups of ☕️ and listening to podcasts. I asked our team how they pod—most people said on walks or during chores. What about you?

Comment “Link” to subscribe to ParentData with Emily Oster, joined by some excellent guests.

#parentdata #parentdatapodcast #parentingpodcast #parentingtips #emilyoster
...

Humility. That’s why. That’s the whole reason.

#emilyoster #secondbaby #parentingjokes #parentinghumor

Humility. That’s why. That’s the whole reason.

#emilyoster #secondbaby #parentingjokes #parentinghumor
...

Bug season is upon us. Besides annoyance, this can bring up safety concerns, particularly with ticks. They are carriers of diseases, most notably Lyme disease. So what’s the best course of action?

Prevention is key! I suggest:
⭐ Regular tick checks
⭐ Using bug sprays with DEET 
⭐ Wearing long sleeves and pants in the woods

Some parents worry about DEET, but repellants with up to 30% DEET are recommended by both the CDC and AAP. The data says you’re in the clear, so go for it. Enjoy your summer!

#parentdata #emilyoster #tickseason #bugbites #bugspray

Bug season is upon us. Besides annoyance, this can bring up safety concerns, particularly with ticks. They are carriers of diseases, most notably Lyme disease. So what’s the best course of action?

Prevention is key! I suggest:
⭐ Regular tick checks
⭐ Using bug sprays with DEET
⭐ Wearing long sleeves and pants in the woods

Some parents worry about DEET, but repellants with up to 30% DEET are recommended by both the CDC and AAP. The data says you’re in the clear, so go for it. Enjoy your summer!

#parentdata #emilyoster #tickseason #bugbites #bugspray
...